Don’t Eat, Sleep

Frequent sleepless nights may be increasing your waistline…as well as your risk of developing diabetes. While the details of this relationship are still not well understood, both laboratory and epidemiological data strongly suggest that there is a link. Authors of an April 2007 study published in the journal Sleep Medicine Review suggest three ways that sleep deprivation may increase your obesity and/or diabetes risk. Namely, failing to get sufficient sleep leads to decreased energy levels, alterations in blood glucose levels, and an overactive appetite, which encourages you to eat regardless of actual hunger levels.

The Bigger Picture: Whether you're male or female, thick or thin, young or not-so-young, sleep is important for looking and feeling your best. Among other things, your body repairs and rebuilds muscle and bone tissues and replenishes glycogen stores while you sleep. Conversely, insufficient sleep leads to undesirable imbalances in leptin (an appetite suppressor) and ghrelin (an appetite stimulator) hormone levels. Though a true cause-effect relationship between lack of sleep and disease can't be proven yet, it's probably more than coincidence that the rate of obesity and diabetes prevalence coincides with the sleep curtailment that developed in the 1970's and 80's. Shoot for at least 7-8 hours of quality sleep every night.
Leave a Comment
Comments
#1
Joe Lyons
May 25, 2007
This is probably the most under-rated aspect of a good training program. We all focus on training, then dieting, but not enough time resting and sleeping.
#2
JOE CARTER
May 28, 2007
MOST GUYS CAN GET THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF SLEEP. HOWEVER THEY STAY UP LATE OR GO TO BED AT THE LAST SECOND.....GO TO SLEEP OR THROW ABOUT 40% OF ALL THAT WORK AT THE GYM OUT THE WINDOW
#3
Adam Fridinger
Jun 03, 2007
It is unreal at just how important maintaining a good rest cycle is. Think about how you feel the next day when you haven't slept your usual amount. The body must rest for growth and repair.
#4
shawn le
Jun 11, 2007
this is freakin true! i just switched to first shift and was use to sleeping in late. I normally get only 6-5 hours a night and i definitely seen an increase in my weight and i have been eating more due to being awake more longer!