Training

You might have heard that stretching can have a negative impact on physical performance. Does this happen with all types of stretching, and how long does the effect last? A study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness offers insight into these questions.
 
Over the course of 3 days, researchers had 12 male taekwondo athletes sprint 20 meters before and after 3 types of stretching exercises: static, ballistic and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). Sprint times increased after all types of stretching, and the effect lasted for 15 to 20 minutes with static and PNF techniques. Sprint times recovered after only 5 minutes with ballistic stretching.
 
Supplements

Like many sports nutrition products, beta-alanine isn’t likely to do much for active adults after a single dose. Those interested in exploring the potential of this popular ingredient might be interested in the findings of a review of studies published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness.
 
Researchers analyzed 23 beta-alanine studies that appeared between 2005 and 2015, most using physically active subjects. They average daily dosage was 4.8 grams and the average intervention period was 5.2 weeks. Although there were no statistically significant changes in power or work capacity, beta-alanine supplementation seemed to improve a subject’s perception of exertion along with biochemical parameters that influence muscle fatigue.
 
Nutrition

If you train like an athlete with professional aspirations, it might be helpful to see how the pros in your sport eat. Consider the servings of carbohydrates and protein consumed by English Premier League players during a week with 2 matches and 5 training sessions. Findings were published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism.
 
Average pre-match carbohydrate consumption was 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per kg of body weight. Players consumed around 1 gram of carbs per kg of body weight after competition. On training days, protein intake ranged from 0.3 grams per kg of body weight at breakfast to 0.6 grams per kg at lunch and 0.8 grams per kg at dinner.